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The EnergyREV Research Consortium

The EnergyREV Consortium has been formed to drive forward research on Smart Local Energy Systems. Energy systems around the world are going through a phase of rapid change. Smaller scale, decentralised technologies associated with solar, wind, storage, sensors and control systems are developing at a rapid pace and presenting considerable market opportunities. This research supports the UK Government's Prospering from the Energy Revolution programme.

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Project | 02
The Oxford Martin Programme on Integrating Renewable Energy​

Mitigating climate change is a major challenge for the 21st Century and requires a transition to low carbon energy systems. Technical approaches to accommodating intermittency in power systems are excess generation capacity, demand flexibility, energy storage and grid inter-connection. However, the best way to deploy these is not agreed. This programme aims to explore the social, technical, market, and policy requirements for integrating renewables across a wide range of scales and contexts.

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Project | 03
Smart Energy Homes

The focus of work within the smart energy home space has expanded from the psychological and engineering perspectives on residential energy management technologies to exploring the broader connected home challenges. Current research aims to identify the interactions that will lead to the greatest impacts in both the immediate and long term by focusing on consumer adoption of energy focussed smart home technology, the products themselves, and the landscape of the industry. 

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Project | 04
Lighting Vanuatu

This project explored the rapid transition from kerosene to solar LED lighting in Vanuatu. The research investigated whether solar powered lighting systems are economically, socially, and environmentally appropriate for developing countries. Specifically, it evaluated the environmental impact of both solar and kerosene lamps, the energy culture associated with the shift from kerosene to solar, and the economic impact on the local communities.